People

Leadership

Bob Kopp

Bob Kopp

I am a climate scientist, geobiologist, and climate policy scholar. I serve at Rutgers University as Director of the Rutgers Institute of Earth, Ocean & Atmospheric Sciences and as a professor in the Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences. My research focuses on understanding uncertainty in past and future climate change, with major emphases on sea-level change and on the interactions between physical climate change and the economy.

Research Faculty

Greg Garner

Greg Garner

I am a meteorologist and climate scientist working on a comprehensive computational framework for projecting sea-level rise in a changing climate. Broadly, I’m interested in how people use tools and information to inform decisions. This has afforded me the opportunity to study a diverse range of topics including weather, climate change, atmospheric chemistry, air quality, robust decision making, sea-level rise, heatwaves, and more alongside experts in social sciences, statistics, economics, philosophy, mathematics, and engineering. I use state-of-the-art optimization tools, statistical methods, integrated assessment models, and data analysis to investigate complex problems across multiple disciplines. I emphasize the importance of science communication throughout my research by publishing with open-access (when available), performing science-outreach activities, and sharing the products of my work through web-based tools and code repositories.

Postdocs

Erica Ashe

Erica Ashe

Statistics is the mathematical body of science pertaining to collection, organization, analysis, interpretation and presentation of data. The complex nature of the spatial and temporal data used for climate process reconstruction produces unique statistical challenges, which highlight the importance of interdisciplinary research. Without an understanding of the scientific processes underlying observable data, as well as the theoretical foundations of the statistical tools used in analysis, the data may be misinterpreted. I am interested in applying this theory to the current problems in prediction and forecasting, as well as modeling, of the relationships between sea level and ice sheet volumes over time and space, as they relate to unobservable parameters of the geoid. Using commonly accepted ice sheet histories and earth parameter profiles, including different lithospheric thicknesses, and upper and lower mantle viscosities, I am developing a stochastic emulator of the sea-level equation.

Meredith Fish

Daniel Gilford

Daniel Gilford

I am a climate scientist seeking to answer the question "How do aspects of climate evolve and affect local coastal communities?" My current research focuses the deep uncertainties in polar ice-sheet contributions to global and local sea level rise. I use a blend of statistical and machine learning techniques to study ice-sheet model emulation, the emergence of Antarctic contributions to sea level rise, and paleoclimate/observational constraints on ice-sheet model projections. I studied Atmospheric Science with Prof. Susan Solomon at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and received my doctorate degree in 2018. My graduate research fused middle atmospheric chemistry, radiation, and tropical cyclone theory to explore tropopause region influences on hurricane intensities. Connecting my expertise in sea level and hurricane science, I am also actively investigating changes in future coastal hazards and flooding. I’m motivated to work on societally relevant problems and science communication, and I aspire to connect science and communities. I also aim to teach and prepare the next generation of scientists to meet the challenges posed by climate change.

Jennifer Walker

Jennifer Walker

I am broadly interested in sea level research and climate and how sea level rise into the future will affect coastal communities. My research examines past sea-level change to bridge the gap between short-term instrumental records and long-term geological reconstructions and to better understand future sea-level rise under changing climate. I focus on reconstructing Holocene sea-level changes along the U.S. Atlantic coast using biological and geological indicators. These proxies are used to quantify rates of sea-level change and examine spatial and temporal variability. The goal of this research is to improve understanding of past sea level to better predict how sea level rise into the future will affect coastal systems and coastal communities.

Graduate students

Laura Geronimo

Laura Geronimo

I am pursuing a PhD in Planning and Public Policy at the Bloustein School. My research interest lies at the intersection of coastal climate risk and resilience, land use planning, and social equity issues. I plan to apply mixed methods and transdisciplinary research approaches to better understand how communities are adapting to coastal hazards. Along with the physical risks that threaten coastal communities (e.g.: sea level rise, storms and storm surge, erosion), I study the spatial distribution of social vulnerability, patterns of coastal development, and the political, institutional, and practical barriers to implementing efficient and equitable adaptation strategies. I am currently developing a research design to evaluate equity considerations in federally funded property-acquisition programs. I graduated from Georgia Tech with a Master’s degree in City and Regional Planning in 2019. Prior to Georgia Tech I spent 5 years in Puerto Rico where I worked in climate change adaptation and hazard mitigation planning.

Kristen Joyse

Kristen Joyse

I am a geoscientist interested in using evidence of past climate change to improve understanding of physical Earth systems and projections of future climate. My interests lie particularly within aspects of climate that have large social implications, including sea level rise, major storm frequency, and resource availability. I am currently a member of Rutgers University’s first cohort of trainees in the Coastal Climate Risk and Resilience initiative, which focuses on the transdisciplinary research and collaboration I am interested in. My current research is focused on relative sea level rise in the Western Mediterranean Basin and its implications for past civilizations. Additionally, I am working on a paleostorm reconstruction for the New Jersey coast from overwash deposits in backbarrier environments.

D.J. Rasmussen

D.J. Rasmussen

I study both the physical and social science aspects of sea-level rise and coastal floods. My career goal is to produce new research that equips coastal stakeholders with information that can aid decisions on coastal flood protection strategies. My hope is that these efforts will lead to future planning and policies that save money and protect human lives. Recently, I’ve been developing a framework for designing coastal flood protection under uncertain sea-level rise. I also examine the politics surrounding efforts to conceive, design, and implement coastal flood protection mega-projects, such as storm surge barriers. I expect to complete my PhD in Public Policy & International Affairs in 2020, and I also have a BS in Atmospheric & Oceanic Science and an MS in Civil & Environmental Engineering.

External Affiliates

Ian Bolliger (UC-Berkeley)

Ian Bolliger (UC-Berkeley)

I am a Berkeley Graduate Fellow in the Energy and Resources Group (ERG) and the Global Policy Laboratory (GPL) at UC Berkeley, advised by Solomon Hsiang and Daniel Kammen. I am a member of the Climate Impact Lab, in which my research focuses predicting regional, socioeconomic impacts of climate change on coastal communities. I use both empirical and dynamical modeling approaches to address this task, often leveraging the growing database of global satellite imagery. Currently, I am developing a spatially-resolved, probabilistic quantification of the economic risk to coastal communities due to changes in hurricane frequency and intensity that are driven by climate change. I earned my BA in Applied Mathematics from Harvard University in 2011 and MS degrees in Energy and Resources (2016) and Civil and Environmental Engineering (2017) from UC Berkeley. Prior to graduate school I modeled global disease burden at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation in my hometown of Seattle, WA.

Roger Creel (Columbia)

Roger is a graduate student at Columbia University working with Dr. Jacky Austermann. His research uses records of past sea level to understand ice volume changes during glacial cycles. Current projects involve detecting a Holocene readvance of the Antarctic ice sheet in the sea level record and modeling how Antarctic inception ~34 million years ago changed sea levels. Roger graduated from Amherst College in 2013 with degrees in geology and English, and danced professionally with the Louisville Ballet before matriculating at Columbia.

Alumni

Postdocs

Graduate students co-advised

Undergraduate students

  • Corie Hlavaty (senior thesis student; BS ‘13 in Geological Sciences)
  • Kinan Tadmori (undergraduate research assistant, 2012-2013; BS ‘15 in Biological Sciences/Environmental Policy)
  • Andrew Wang (undergraduate research assistant, 2012-2013; BS ‘15 in Mechanical Engineering)
  • Zeal Shah (undergraduate research assistant, 2013-2014; BS ‘15 in Mechanical Engineering)
  • Emily Zee (undergraduate research assistant, 2013-2014; BS ‘16 in Mechanical Engineering)
  • Christina Williamson (summer research experience, 2016; Pomona College)
  • Rachel DiSciullo (undergraduate research assistant, 2015-2016; BS ‘16 in Philosophy and Political Science)